Blog Archive

Chicago Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Applauds New Fair Housing Rule

Yesterday the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) issued an important new fair housing regulation aimed at promoting diverse, inclusive communities and overcoming the negative effects of segregation. The regulation is designed to guide cities and counties in complying with their obligation to “affirmatively further fair housing,” a key provision of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. The regulation requires state and local governments and housing authorities to work to eliminate fair housing barriers for people of color, families with children and people with disabilities. 

Although our nation made some progress, we remain a highly segregated society. Chicago is still extremely segregated, by both race and income. Segregation can be detrimental; where you live has a large impact on how your life unfolds. It determines the schools your children attend, the jobs you have access to, the quality of your surroundings, your access to transportation, grocery stores, and other important community resources. Children who grow up in racially concentrated areas of poverty that lack these resources can have negative prospects, which hurt the growth and prosperity of Chicago.

HUD’s  new “affirmatively furthering fair housing” rule will help all jurisdictions in Illinois be more deliberate and strategic about how they use their housing and community development resources to expand access to opportunity for all Chicago area residents.  Through legal representation, education, and advocacy, the Chicago Lawyers' Committee’s Fair Housing Project works to eliminate housing discrimination and promote fair and equal housing in the Chicago metropolitan area. We look forward to working to ensure that all people – regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, family status or disability – can chose where to live, and all neighborhoods are good places to live. 

Contact: Betsy Shuman-Moore | (312) 630-9744 | BShuman-Moore@clccrul.org